August 24, 1914

Share London, August 24, 1914. Dear Mamma: We are still in London but expect to leave to-morrow morning. We have been constantly on the go and have seen a great deal of the city. At first I thought it would be hard to find my way around the city but I don’t believe I would ever get lost here now. We spent Saturday afternoon in the British Museum, which is the most wonderful thing we have seen. Everything is very quiet here now. Most of the Americans have gotten away or, at least, they are not rushing around as excitedly as when we got here. The people are very calm and business continues as usual. This is a very popular war and everyone expects it to last a long while, but is willing to fight it out. The Irish have stopped their fuss and are coming to the defense of the flag. The militant suffragettes have stopped their “raising Cain” and the ones in prison have been released. Paul and I have decided to go to Paris in the morning. We were around to the French Consulate this morning and had our papers fixed up. We will send you our address later. We are leaving our trunk here at 37 Torrington Square, as it would be so much trouble to take it with us. Our mail will be forwarded from here in case we find we are going to stay long. Will write you again in a few days. Love to all, Kiffin...

August 14, 1914

ShareU. S. M. S. St. Paul, August 14, 1914. Dear Mamma: We are now in the Irish Channel and expect to arrive in Liverpool at six o’clock this evening. We do not go to Southampton as the English Channel is closed. I have spent a week of absolute rest, thinking neither of the past nor the future. Paul and I both feel the best we have in years and I think I have gained at least two pounds. We have enjoyed the trip. There is certainly a cosmopolitan bunch on board. Here are a few of them: the Duchess of Marlborough; two or three Lords; several Ladies and a few Knights; several U. S. army officers, including two generals, Col. Samuel Reber, chief of the aviation department of the U. S. Army (whom Paul and I have grown to know well); Dr. Seaman, a famous U. S. army surgeon; Irvin S. Cobb, and Will Irwin. There is also one De Besa, who calls himself a Brazilian count and has been dabbling in Mexican politics for several years and was on President Madera’s staff. He is a 33rd degree Mason, has traveled all over the world and speaks several languages. Everyone has him down as a faker, but he is certainly most interesting to talk to. Then there is a Hungarian officer in the Red Cross who wants to get back to his country. I suspect him of being a spy. He is of the better class and has lived in all the great cities of the world, speaks fluently five languages. There are French and English reservists and adventurers of...

August 6, 1914

ShareHotel Imperial, New York City, Thursday, Aug. 6, 1914. Dear Mamma: Well, Paul and I are sailing on the American liner, St. Paul, to-morrow morning at 10 o’clock. We would have gone by home to see you and explain things if there had been time. But we had to do some hurrying to catch this boat and it was practically our only safe chance. It is the only boat leaving here in two weeks time flying the U. S. flag and we did not want to wait two weeks. I don’t want you to worry or feel bad. You have always told me that you wanted me to live my life without interference and this opportunity is one that only comes once in a lifetime. I would not have come with Paul if I had not felt it was really a great opportunity. We stopped off in Washington to-day and got our passports. We also carry letters of introduction to Hon. Walter Page, Ambassador to Great Britain, and to Stovall, Ambassador to Switzerland. He used to spend much time at Kenilworth Inn and you probably know him. We are due to arrive in Southampton and from there will go across to Paris. You know I have always been a great dreamer and I just couldn’t keep myself from this trip, for I felt the call of opportunity. Youhave always said you had great faith in my future and now is the time for you to prove it, by not worrying about me. I will write you often, but of course the mails will be uncertain. You can write me...