Chapter IV, Parts III-VI

Share Chapter IV Account of death from “Flying For France,” by James Rogers McConnell Captain Thénault’s speech at grave Two articles by Paul Scott Mowrer; Editorial from Charlestown News and Courier Article from L’Illustration Berlin dispatch to Journal de Genève Zundel’s letter. III Kiffin Rockwell’s death was recounted and commented upon by the press of every civilized country in the world. Of the thousands of articles written, none were finer or expressed with more feeling than two news stories by Paul Scott Mowrer cabled to the Chicago Daily News, and an unsigned editorial from the Charleston (South Carolina) News and Courier, which are reproduced below: Paris, France, September 25.—When Kiffin Yates Rockwell, American airman in the service of France, and brother of Paul Ayres Rockwell, of the Daily News staff of war correspondents, fell in an aëroplane duel in the Vosges, his life ended as he himself would have preferred. The death of a friend is always a shock, but Rockwell’s death was not a surprise. In tireless and excessive intrepidity he almost seemed to have courted it only as a means of fighting for the cause of France, which was dearer to him than life. Since leaving the Foreign Legion for the air service, Rockwell had brought down four German aëroplanes officially and probably others which dropped uncounted inside the enemy lines. He had been decorated with the war cross and the military medal; he was frequently mentioned in the order of the day and he was recently proposed for promotion as lieutenant. While stationed in the Verdun region he was more hours in the air than any...

Chapter IV, Parts I-II

ShareChapter IV Account of death from “Flying For France,” by James Rogers McConnell Captain Thénault’s speech at grave Two articles by Paul Scott Mowrer; Editorial from Charlestown News and Courier Article from L’Illustration Berlin dispatch to Journal de Genève Zundel’s letter. I Kiffin Rockwell and Lufbery were the first to get their new machines ready and on the 23rd of September went out for the first flight since the escadrille had arrived at Luxeuil. They became separated in the air but each flew on alone, which was a dangerous thing to do in the Alsace sector. There is but little fighting in the trenches there, but great air activity. Due to the British and French squadrons at Luxeuil, and the threat their presence implied, the Germans had to oppose them by a large fleet of fighting machines. I believe there were more than forty Fokkers alone in the camps of Colmar and Habsheim. Observation machines protected by two or three fighting planes would venture far into our lines. It is something the Germans dare not do on any other part of the front. They had a special trick that consisted in sending a large, slow observation machine into our lines to invite attack. When a French plane would dive after it, two Fokkers, that had been hovering high overhead, would drop on the tail of the Frenchman and he stood but small chance if caught in the trap. Just before Kiffin Rockwell reached the lines he spied a German machine under him, flying at 11,000 feet. I can imagine the satisfaction he felt in at last catching an enemy...